TV in Little Guy?

Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
So what size/style TV do you have in your Little Guy?   I know I've seen some 19" models mentioned by members but would be curious how things are working out for you and if there are any issues or suggestions you might have for others?   How do you secure it during travel, have you mounted TV's in trailers with AC and post up some cabin area shots if you have them.  
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Comments

  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Mike, things to consider. Can you access the DVD when the TV is mounted? Will the mount allow you access to the cabinet and shelf behind it? Will the T/V move enough to be out of the way of the A/C? I have a 19", mounted on a swivel mount that also goes up and down, and sideways. I've posted pictures of it a while back and I'm not at my computer right now. It's mounted to the vertical upright on the right side of the A/C. I can see it either laying down or sitting up. I like it and I feel rather luxurious being able to be inside during a thunderstorm watching a DVD!!!
  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The A/C unit would be the impediment in the Silver Shadow and you would definitely need the right mount and as you noted, something that swivels up and down and is adjustable.  The picture tends to distort when you are laying down in the trailer and that is a concern for sure.  And during travel you would need to lock down the TV so it's not bouncing around and damaging the walls or TV unit itself.  
  • JustJohnJustJohn Member Posts: 106
    edited December 2013
    Mike, This is how I Mounted mine. It can be moved to one side out of the way of AC or pulled out a bit to access the cabinet. Notice the antenna mounted on the cabinet door, opening the door changes the antenna angle 90 degrees when looking for stations. I had intended to mount the antenna outside, but it worked so well inside, I stopped carrying the fiberglass mast for it. The TV is a 15 inch Naxa. With the mount I used, I do not tie or bungee the TV when traveling I just check the swivel bolts occasionally and so far no issues. 

    John

    image
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here's my pictures, Mike, if you can see them.  The mount is about 3" below the ceiling so that I can get a DVD into the slot on the top of the TV (who would ever think of that????).  I had planned on having the mount right next to the ceiling, but that wasn't to be.

    The TV can be pushed over in front of the right cabinet door, far enough over to be out of the direct stream of air from the A/C.  And, a pretty clear picture.  On the 19", I haven't been finding any distortion, to speak of, since you are pretty close to the screen.

  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2013
    Does your mount tilt any John?  

    And when you folks mounted these sets the support post is fully accessible from the cabinet area?  
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Mike, if you mean, could I see the support post behind the trim that I mounted the TV mount to?  No, you cannot see the support post.

    From my woodworking/building background, I know there has to be a strong vertical support member for the A/C unit.  Therefore, there must be strong support members on either side of the A/C, and there would also be two horizontal pieces used to tied the two vertical pieces together. 

    Just picture a window in a house under construction, Mike.  There are vertical support members on either sides, and horizontal support members above and below the window opening.  Picture the same in the SS for the support of the A/C unit. 

  • JustJohnJustJohn Member Posts: 106
    edited November 2013
    The mount does tilt Mike, but not a lot. Also should mention with my 15 in. TV the bottom of the TV is about even with the bottom of the cabinetry so no lost leg/foot room, but this might be an issue with a larger screen. As far as mounting, I mounted the bracket snug against the AC trim and as high as the cabinet door allowed using slightly shorter screws than the ones supplied with the mount. I also pre drilled the screw holes to make sure no splitting and you may want to wax the screws as well. Can you tell I really don't like to put holes in my SS.
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Mike, here's a picture of YOUR Silver Shadow as it was being constructed.  Look at the picture with just the hole for the A/C.  It looks like there is a 2x2 behind the 1x3 trim piece.

    Here:

  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thanks Verna....  So you were able to access the back of the bolt holes relatively easy?  
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Mike, the bolts are "lag bolts", not machine bolts.  They are screwed into wood with either a wrench or a socket.  No nuts and bolts, and you don't need to get to the rear of the bolt holes. 

    Here's a picture of a lag bolt.  The lag bolts were included in the hardware package of the TV mount (not the size in the attachment--that one is just an example for you).  

  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thanks Verna, I'll have an added edge here when I get ready to tackle this chore!   
  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I'm curious, has anyone removed the access panel inside the cabin area to reach up and inside the cavity that houses the air conditioning unit to see if there is a means of reaching up and installing nuts on the back of bolts for mounting a TV?  If the access hole affords some clearance within that area it seems that the possibility might exist?  Just sayin'  
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Mike, to answer your question "no".  Try this:  There are screws holding the sides of the A/C unit in place on each side of the wood frame around the A/C unit.  Try removing them, and see if you can't slide the A/C unit out.  Then you would be able to get to the upright supports for the A/C.  You could then use bolts with nuts and washers. 
  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2013
    I will give that a try Verna, but before that I will probably send a note to the factory and see what their recommendations are.  Had I figured this out beforehand I would have had them place a TV mount in the trailer for me but in these situations you just go with your gut feeling and figure that in the end that things will work out, which I feel will be the case here too.  
  • jmsepesyjmsepesy Member Posts: 154
    Mike, I took the access panel off my SS and it seems like there is duct work from the side vents to the AC. I could not find any useful area in there to do anything. It was impressive that all of it has reflective silver stuff.  Hope this helps.
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    One thing to think about, Mike, is that lag bolts hold electrical and telephone cables onto power/telephone poles for years.  I have no worries that the lag bolts I put through will continue to hold my TV mount.
  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I know Verna as I've driven in plenty of 4 & 5" lags in poles and there were times they were tough getting back out, especially in the old blackjack poles or salt treated poles.  But if I can bolt it in I'd prefer that with the bounce and road travel.  No doubt the lags will do the job, but would just be more comfortable with a bolted installation.  
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    OK, I do understand.
  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Verna, I just sent a note to Scott and will see what they have to say.   If there is an easy means of accessing the support next to the A/C unit I'll go that route and if not I'll lag it in.  What size lags did you use? 
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    They came with the TV mount, Mike. I think about 3" long...can't remember the diameter. I predrilled smaller, and then screwed the lag bolt in 3/4 of the way in. Then put them through the mount and put them in all of the way. It tightened up really well and is still tight... Even after that chuckhole on I- 70 that I hit so hard.
  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    :))   Sounds like you have tested it well!   
  • Lisa33Lisa33 Member Posts: 1,781 ✭✭✭✭
    I originally had a 22" TV in my 6x10 SS. Found it to be too huge. "Luckily" it got fried due to the electrical problems I had with the trailer, so I replaced it with a 19". Better, but probably still too big for my taste. If I had to do it over again, I'd probably go with 15" as a nice compromise in viewing size vs bulk. If you have it on one of the extendible arm type mounts, you can extend it forward toward you for a larger viewing experience. Just my 2 cents. I've looked at the thread a bunch of times and haven't chimed in.
  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Was your set pre-mounted Lisa or did you install it after purchasing it?  
  • Lisa33Lisa33 Member Posts: 1,781 ✭✭✭✭
    I installed it after purchase. I had LG install the wooden flat ceiling mounting surface, but purchased and installed the TV myself.
  • michaelwestonmichaelweston Member Posts: 5
    Hi, can someone point me toward the ceiling mount for a Littleguy? I have looked at so many TV mounts online I have confused myself as usual. By the way, I am a new LG owner ( less than a week) and I will post pictures as soon as the current cold snap dissipates.
  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I don't believe you are going to be able to mount anything up on the ceiling of the trailer Michael as there really isn't enough support up there to accomplish that.  I am in the process of mounting a TV in my new SS right now and was kicking ideas back and forth last night via text with Verna regarding this task.  The best spot or strongest point to mount a TV mount in the photo below (of my trailer) are the vertical support posts on either side of the air conditioning unit shown in the photo.  You are going to want to make sure that the TV mount stays in the vertical or upright position for support (as it's designed) and use great care when drilling the holes so that the wood doesn't split or become damaged.   That would be my suggestion as otherwise you will need to beef up the area behind the mount should you try to mount it above the AC unit.  

    Hope that helps!

    image
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2013
    Michael, a 5x8 Silver Shadow is different than the 5x10 ( as you well know!!). You will be able to reach inside the cabinets to feel where the best vertical support is in your cabinet area. As Mike said, we were kicking around ideas last night. The bracket on my TV mount is 3" side, and the vertical birch trim pieces of the SS's cabinets are just 2". If you have cabinet doors all of the way across the width of the SS, then you 'll have to "play around" to see where your new mount will fit and be secure on one of the structural wooden members. Try using blue painters tape as templates to figure out your placement. Once you drill the holes, you 're committed!! Good Luck.
  • kokomoslowkokomoslow Member Posts: 46
    I'm not sure how this will work over time, but it's working great right now. I mounted mine on the top support sideways. I know that's not how it should be done but after tightening down the set screws all is good. And from what I have read most of you secure the TV during travel anyway.
    And one thing , Do you all remove your electronics in the winter?
  • Two thoughts come to mind .....
    The woodworkers in this group know a lot more about that environment than I do but I'm under the impression that the wood glues on the market today form a bond almost as strong as the wood itself. If you took a nice 3/8 inch thick piece of matching wood (with beveled edges for appearance), cut to the size of the large rectangular area above the air conditioner and screwed down with small finishing screws after first being coated with the appropriate amount of glue, you would have an adequate base for mounting any TV. This quite large area would form an enormous bond and provide the thickness for good sized fasteners and distribute the load of the TV and mount over such a large area that the actual psi would be minimal.

    Secondly, I am an advocate of using a TV mount that allows you to drop in the TV on the end of the arm and lift it off of the mount when it isn't being used. The load on the mount where it attaches to the wall increases logarithmically when you cantilever the weight of the TV out on the arm. We have experienced roadways (at speed) in such bad shape that the shock loads to components inside our [email protected] have to be larger than most imagine. I know most people secure the TV in the retracted position but they can get loose and move about sometimes. We're videophile types who prefer the big screen experience for movies and find (unlike Lisa ;) ) that our 32 inch LCD is the perfect size for our [email protected] and isn't in the way at all when we're not watching TV. It weighs 10 lbs and lifts in and out of the bracket in seconds. Also helps to get it out of the cooking environment as well. I know the LG owners have a completely different set of criteria but I've noted that the 12 volt TVs weigh much more than the standard screens do. The 19 inch Jensen weighs more than the 32 inch we have for example.
    In any case, I think the mount surface idea might work but the woodworkers out there may have more information than I do.

  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2013

    John, 

    Mike and I discussed him mounting his TV like you did, but I told him that I felt that the mounting bracket was designed to go vertically to garner more strength for extending the TV.  But, if yours is working, that is fine for you.  You are bolted into a strong structural member of the SS. 

    I will tell you that I hit a chuckhole that was over 4" deep on I-70.  The bungee cord holding my TV in place was knocked loose, although the TV was fine.  I had things move on the galley shelf that hadn't moved in over 6,000 miles.  Just be sure to check your mounting bolts often because of road hazards.

    I don't leave my SS outside as I have room in the garage for it.  As far as the electronics, they do get cold, and they will take longer to turn on when cold. I do leave my electronics (including microwave) in place in the winter because I do camp occasionally in the winter.

  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2013

    Neil, I'm a woodworker.  As far as using glue to attach anything to the interior wood in an LG, small or larger, you would need to sand the entire finish off of the surface area to be glued.  I personally don't care to sand a lacquer finish off of anything (lots of toxicity in that dust!). 

    Although there are lots of glues out there, I figure if the camper industry doesn't use glue to adhere the trim, etc. to the structural member, then it's not a really good idea as far as looking at the longevity of your fix.  The camper industry uses screws and bolts, realizing that safety is paramount when taking into account the movement of all pieces when traveling.  I would not recommend using even the most expensive glues to attach a piece of wood to hang a TV off of that could fall off and have the potential to harm the occupants.

    An easier way would just be to remove the A/C unit from the opening, and bolt additional 2x2's to the rear of the plywood panel, and to the existing structural members.  While this entails more work, safety in our "renovations" and additions should always be first in our minds. 

  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2013
    I believe I have found that "sweet spot" if you will for mounting the bracket and TV to.   And one thing I do with all these TV's when mounted is what Verna does, by using a bungy style cord to keep it retracted and in place during times of travel.  I have forgotten to do this several times but all was well.  What I do is to attach the bungy cord across the knobs on the cabinets to keep the TV in place and the doors never open during travel.  I'm thinking that this time around I will also place a piece of fabric around the bungy cord too though as I have noticed some wear marks on the sides of the plastic TV housing, but no damage to the screen itself.  

    I hear what you are saying too Neil regarding removing the TV, but space is very tight in the mounting area and I'd never be able to do that above the AC unit because of the limited clearance between the TV and roof of the trailer.  I'm darn lucky to even get it into this area, as otherwise I'd have to mount it lower and beneath the cupboard itself which I don't want to do.   This way there is no clutter and it will be in a spot that allows use of the AC unit and access into the cupboard too.  

    Live and learn right?  
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here's a picture of Mike's A/C cabinet as it was being built (I hope it's OK to use your picture, Mike, to illustrate the construction).  On the 5x10 SS, there is about a 6" plenum between the cabin and galley that is used for ventilation for A/C.  The silver ductwork is the return air ducting or the intake ducting....I just know it's the ducting for the A/C, I'm not sure which it is used for.   As you can see, if the A/C unit is removed you can reach up into the A/C cabinet to bolt extra bracing above the A/C unit. 

    Now, for clarification, this is the 5x10 SS.  And, the finished cabinet is the 2nd picture. 

  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Here's a shot of Mike's A/C cabinet after it was built and just after TV and mount installed this afternoon.   :D

    image
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2013

    I see that red light on the space heater!!  Cold in your garage!!

    Looks good.  You were able to get yours closer to the ceiling than I was because my old TV had the DVD player on the top of the TV.  I'll see how the new TV fits. I may have to move the bracket up higher.

    And, Mike, if you unplug the A/C and pull some slack on the cord through the wall, you can plug the A/C in the top outlet and then you can use the bottom outlet for your space heater.  How often will you be using them both at the same time?

     

  • kokomoslowkokomoslow Member Posts: 46
    This forum is great.  By just reading little things come up that I would not have thought of.  Thanks Verna
      Any more tricks of the Silver Shadow ?????  Mine is only about three weeks older than Mikes.  Now all we have to do is find an easy way to remount the plate on the galley lid.  Scott has deferred to Allen, sill waiting for his reply
  • I hear what you are saying too Neil regarding removing the TV, but space is very tight in the mounting area and I'd never be able to do that above the AC unit because of the limited clearance between the TV and roof of the trailer. 
    You know, I completely forgot about the need to have space above the mount that is necessary to place the TV into it. It's just like football ... "a game of inches"  :D
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well, John....we ought to just have a section for helpful hints.  I'll have to talk to Mike about that.

    One hint that I found out the hard way, is to have a set of Allen wrenches with you while camping.  Make sure one of them fit the Allen screw on the handle of your hatch.  I had every other tool I could think of, except the correct size Allen wrench at the CRA (Crossroads of America in Spencer, IN bi-annual teardrop/tiny travel trailer gathering).  I finally found someone who had a set of screwdriver ends with the correct size.  Otherwise I would have had to strap the hatch closed with a ratcheting strap. 

    If you don't have an outlet at the headboard and you want one...find a surge suppressor with an 8' cord.  It will plug into the outlet at the foot of the bed.  Drill a 1 1/2" hole into the bottom of the shelf under the plug, another one into the storage at the head of the bed, another hole through the headboard shelf.  Put the surge suppressor on the headboard, push the plug through the holes, lay the cord on top of the plywood, and bring it up at the foot of the bed into the shelf and plug it in.  I now have my camera battery charger and iPhone charger at my headboard, instead of laying on the mattress.

    That's enough for now......

  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Kokomo, here's what I did with my license plate.

    The ordering info is here.  It cost under $25, it sits on top of the driver's side tail light, and it works well.  I've bumped into it I don't know how many times in the garage and nothing has happened to it (knock on wood!). 

    I have about 7,600 miles on my SS since the end of April and this bracket has been on there for 3,400 miles of it....give or take a couple of miles  :D

  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    And folks we do have a place for these tips.....  Right here!
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yeah, an admin, moderator who doesn't even know all of the "tips and tricks" of the forum!!!!  Thanks, Mike!!
  • Time_Out1Time_Out1 Member Posts: 473
    If you guys don't mind, I'll show you the articulating arm we use in our Retro 150 to mount our 19" Vizio.

    The first and last photos show the locking mechanism that secures the TV to the wall when traveling.

    I have the arm screwed into a framing 'stick' inside the wall and that 'stick' isn't all that wide! I'm probably going to screw a plywood panel onto the wall that will span a couple wall studs and then mount the articulating arm to that.
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Clyde, that looks like a dog choker chain!!

    Where do you attach the ring to on the rear of the TV?

     

  • Time_Out1Time_Out1 Member Posts: 473
    Verna, the chain is spring loaded and the ring is to hook your finger in. When you pull the chain down, the little shiny pin drops down and allows you to fold up the arm and it locks itself into the part of the mount that is screwed onto the wall. Does that make any sense?

    You know, that may have been a dog choker at one time!

  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Clyde, thanks.  Did that come with the arm, or did you make it yourself?

     

  • Time_Out1Time_Out1 Member Posts: 473
    Yes Verna, it all came like that. For a lightweight arm, it is very well made and strong. The TV is able to tilt up or down also.
  • GregorioGregorio Member Posts: 1,933 ✭✭✭✭✭
    You may know this already, but I went ahead pulled up the information for those that haven't given it any thought. 
    The one big question for those living well into the frost belt is: Can LCD televisions handle the freezing temperatures?

    Maybe, Maybe Not  Liquid when allowed to freeze expands, distorts, and even cracks. There is a liquid-based material within the screen of LCD TVs.  Will it be damaged overnight in freezing weather?  Worse yet, if left in storage through the winter in the northern states where temperatures can get bitterly cold, will an LCD flat-screen TV survive?  Information available on the Internet indicates that, in most cases, the possibility of damage is a definite "Maybe".  Not very reassuring.  But the fact is, each manufacturer provides different guidelines for its products, and those guidelines don’t carry over to all other brands of televisions.

    Safe operating temperatures for LCD televisions generally range from +40F to well over +100F. This means that if your LCD TV is kept in an environment below this range, you must allow it at least 24 hours to acclimate to the proper operating range before you plug it in or turn it on.

    Why? When something cold is brought into a warm environment, condensation (or moisture) will be present throughout the device.  Plugging it in or turning it on could result in short circuits, shock, or other catastrophic failure of the unit. If the LCD screen is chilled, even though not frozen, it could fail as well. Manufacturer limitations on cold storage of their LCD TVs varies all over the map.  Some are rated to handle temps as low as -15F to -20F below zero, while others are barely rated to be stored anywhere near the zero mark.

  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks, Greg.  I guess we need to heat up the LG's before we turn on the TV.  That also heats up the bedding, and that's a better thing ;)  It got down to 0* last night, and I imagine it was in the 50's in the garage where the SS is.  I'll be careful when I take the new one out there and bring the old one in the house.

     

     

  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Member Posts: 8,776 ✭✭✭✭✭
    My trailer was heated when I tried the TV out.   This is my third NAXA TV and have never had any issues with any of them.  I agree, cold weather and freezing can create issues with LCD screens, computers, etc.  But this unit is defective and will head back tomorrow to Amazon via UPS.  Just packed it up and will wait for the deliveryman tomorrow.  
  • VernaVerna Member Posts: 3,855 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Well, somehow I guess I ordered the wrong TV.  I got the one WITHOUT the DVD.  I have to pay $12 to return it...cheaper than having a TV I can't watch DVD's on!!!  I ordered the correct one.  Maybe I'll have the correct one by early next week. Strangest thing is that they are both the same price. 
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